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Gardening with Native Plants
May 5, 2011
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Central Oregon Plant Pick: Oregon Sunshine
May 17, 2011

Central Oregon Plant Pick: Annabelle Hydrangea

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We love choosing plants for Bend Oregon landscaping projects! Check our blog or Facebook page for Plant Picks. Share your favorite plants and photos.

Bend Oregon Landscape Plants

The shrub grows 3 - 5' tall

Annabelle Hydrangea: A sterile mophead form of a native American species. ‘Annabelle’ is a deciduous shrub that grow 3 – 5’ tall and wide. ‘Annabelle’ has enormous flower heads (up to 10”) that begin greenish, spend the bulk of summer a creamy white, age to pink and overwinter a papery-brown. Excellent dried, both on the plant and in the house. Blooms on new growth so it’s a great hydrangea to grow in Central Oregon where it thrives in semi-shaded situations with adequate summer moisture. The leaves are 3 – 8” long, dark green serrated. No serious insect or disease problems.

Some people plant ‘Annabelle’ as a hedge since it can be cut back severely in the winter for a tidy effect. This plant is deer resistant. USDA Hardiness Zone 4 – 9

Bend Oregon Landscape Plants

Multi blooms throughout the summer

Bend Oregon Landscape Plants

The flower head can grow up to 10"

3 Comments

  1. Charla says:

    Thanks for your interesting blog! Just wondering: are the “water birch” that you mention susceptible to that beetle that has killed our other birches?? We’re still looking for a tree to replace our last birch in front of the house.

  2. Anita says:

    I love it when individuals come together and share opinions.
    Great site, continue the good work!

  3. admin says:

    The white-barked birch trees such as the European White Birch or Jacquemonti Birch are more susceptible to bronze birch borer attacks than species without white bark (River Birch, Birches generally like full sun most of the day. They should have sufficient watering with moist ground. Mulch around the tree helps and pruning it at the right time of the year helps to keep the trees healthier.

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